The major player in the blog game is WordPress, a content management system (CMS) that powers millions of websites, including The New York Times, Quartz, and Variety. WordPress-powered sites are incredibly easy to set up, customize, and update—ideally on a daily basis. You aren't required to learn fancy-schmancy FTP tricks (though you can certainly use them if you like), and there are ridiculous numbers of free and paid WordPress themes and WordPress plug-ins to give your website a pretty face and vastly expanded functionality. Though WordPress dominates the blogging space, it isn't the only blogging CMS of note, however.
Thanks for a great review! My only “con” would be that you didn’t included customer service. But I understand the work it would have involved. I LOVE WIX. I have been with them since they started. But their customer service stinks. I don’t like having to search through a database of questions other users have submitted to find an answer to my problem. They make it hard to find a phone number. Otherwise, besides a few technical beefs I have, it is a great option.

Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's S... See Full Bio
Speaking of usability, website builders are also made to be extremely functional and usable by even novice users. An average website can be built in a matter of hours and changes can be made in minutes. Something that users often fail to keep in mind is that a website is never completed. It is always a work in progress that requires changes and edits and they give users the ability to make snap edits and changes.
The page layout and user interface may also be affected by the use of motion graphics. The choice of whether or not to use motion graphics may depend on the target market for the website. Motion graphics may be expected or at least better received with an entertainment-oriented website. However, a website target audience with a more serious or formal interest (such as business, community, or government) might find animations unnecessary and distracting if only for entertainment or decoration purposes. This doesn't mean that more serious content couldn't be enhanced with animated or video presentations that is relevant to the content. In either case, motion graphic design may make the difference between more effective visuals or distracting visuals.

I have tested all the above, I found that the best editor by far is Wix. They have elements that others don’t have such as being able to use your own fonts and delete elements in templates. However their customer support is really bad. They refer you to their on line tutorials and make it incredibly difficult to actually speak to them when you need to. I had something random happen that was not addressed In their online help section. It took a lot of searching to work out how to submit a help ticket. There is no chat and although they say you can call them, that number is not there. When I finally found how to submit a support ticket, which was buried, they did not reply to it. My account showed I had submitted a ticket but they just didn’t deal with it. I also read many other people complaining about the same thing. Its a real shame. Because its so important to get support, as in my case the random technical error meant I had to take the site down, and they just didn’t get back to me. I found a close second to be My website builder, and they provide chat support.
I have a WordPress site that I am seriously considering shutting down. I love that i get to work with my creativity building sites, but I don’t love that I have been in a cycle of getting the site up, after a month or so, I start getting those Jetpack notifications that my site is down, it’s still not loading, it’s back up. I mean I’ve gotten at least 50 in the last couple of days. I can never figure out what’s wrong with the site so I end up stripping or deleting the whole site and and starting over. I don’t use a lot of plugins (the basics security, backup, some kind of form, elementor, etc). I’d really love to believe that the benefits outweigh
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