In 1996, Flash (originally known as FutureSplash) was developed. At the time, the Flash content development tool was relatively simple compared to now, using basic layout and drawing tools, a limited precursor to ActionScript, and a timeline, but it enabled web designers to go beyond the point of HTML, animated GIFs and JavaScript. However, because Flash required a plug-in, many web developers avoided using it for fear of limiting their market share due to lack of compatibility. Instead, designers reverted to gif animations (if they didn't forego using motion graphics altogether) and JavaScript for widgets. But the benefits of Flash made it popular enough among specific target markets to eventually work its way to the vast majority of browsers, and powerful enough to be used to develop entire sites.[6]

The other side of the "local" coin is that I firmly believe that the quality of work done by an in-house team is significantly better than that which has been outsourced. Out of the thousands of websites I've seen over the years, it's always the ones developed off-shores that have caused issues. They're cheaper for a reason, and they often show it in performance. I understand that the best firm for you may not be down the street, but work with a team that can communicate (frequently) in your language, understand your goals, and be held accountable to meeting them.
As we said in the last step, templates provide a framework. Given how many people use builders to make a website nowadays, odds are there are a few sites out there with the same framework as yours. At the very least you will need to populate a chosen template with content specific to you. And to really stand out, you’ll need to do some customization.

A: Creating the perfect website for your business includes a lot of steps. The design company will first have to understand in detail, your goals and visions for the project. They’ll then have to do research, propose wire frames, revise wire frames, build out and develop the website, and of course make final modifications. With all these steps included, most websites take at least 12 to 16 weeks from start to finish. However, time may be slightly longer or shorter depending on your goals, your designer, and other variables.
If you're on a Mac however, there's another option: RapidWeaver. This WYSIWYG webpage editor has full code access and FTP support for uploading pages. There are plenty of built-in templates to get started, all for the one-time price of $99.99. On Windows there are numerous choices. Xara Web Designer 365, for example, starts at $49.99 and promises you don't need to know HTML or Javascript to create sites based on the company's templates.
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